Battery White Found to be Deserted

•February 24, 1865 • Comments Off on Battery White Found to be Deserted

On February 24, 1865, a party from the U.S.S. Mingoe visited the battery and found it to be unmanned.

(Adapted from the nomination form proposing that Battery White be added to the National Register of Historic Places.  See the complete form (pdf) on our Documentation page.)

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Battery White Needs Men and Arms!

•January 2, 1864 • Comments Off on Battery White Needs Men and Arms!

In January 1864, commanding Brigadier-General J. H. Trapier stated (in one of his several requests for artillery and manpower) that “The position itself is a strong one, and with a proper artillery and a sufficient infantry support might be rendered almost, if not absolutely, Impregnable.”

(The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Vol. XXXV, part 1 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1891), p. 546.)

Battery White Identified as a Strategic Location

•December 30, 1860 • Comments Off on Battery White Identified as a Strategic Location

On December 30, 1860, Charles Alston, aide-de-camp to Governor Francis W. Pickens, encouraged the lowcountry planters to erect batteries:

“The Governor of South Carolina asks your aid in the erection of Batteries to protect and defend the entrance of Winyah Bay and Santee River. Millions of Property and what is far more precious than Wealth Life and Honor will be at stake if we suffer marauding bands to enter our ports….”

(George C. Rogers, Jr., The History of Georgetown County, South Carolina (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1970), p. 388, as quoted from Board of Ordnance Papers, South Carolina Archives.)